Advertisements

On Demand Testing

In an earlier post, it was explained that how a DevOps testing consists of three main types: Scheduled Testing, On-Demand Testing and Triggered Testing. I covered how we scheduled different types of testing in the same article and now let me dig into details of On Demand Testing.

Keeping the notion that “testing is an activity” that is performed more often than a “phase” towards the end, it is necessary to configure Continuous Testing. That requires to setup automated testing jobs in a way that they can be called when needed. This is what we call On Demand Testing. This is contrary to common notion of having testers ready to do testing “On Demand” as features get ready to test.

(the original photo is here)

For example, we have a set of tests that we call “Data Conversion tests” as they convert data from our old file format to new file format. As you can imagine, lot of defects uncovered by such tests are data dependent and a typical bug looks like “Data conversion fails for this particular file due to this type of data”. Now as a Developer takes upon that defect and fixes this particular case, she’d like to be sure that this change hasn’t affected the other dataset in the conversion suite of tests. The conversion testing job is setup in a way that a Developer can run it at any given time.

I shared that we are using Jenkins for the scheduled testing. So one way for an individual team member to run any of the jobs on-demand is to push set of changes, log into the Jenkins system and start a build of automated testing job say Conversion Testing for the above example. This is good, but this might be too late as changes have been pushed. Secondly the Jenkins VMs are setup in a separate location than where the Developer is sitting and feedback time can be anything between 2-3 hours.

Remember, tightening the feedback loop is a main goal of DevOps. The quicker we can let a Developer know that the changes work (or don’t work), the better we are positioned to release more often with confidence.

So in this case, we exploited our existing build scripts which are written in Python but are basically a set of XML files that define parts that can be executed by any team member. We added a shortened dataset that has enough diversity and yet is small, which runs within 15-20 minutes. Then we added a part in the XML file that can do this conversion job on any box at any given time by anyone in the team.

Coming back to the same Developer fixing a Conversion defect, the Developer after fixing the bug now can run the above part on her system. Within half an hour, she’ll have results and if they look good, she’d push changes with a confidence that next round of Scheduled Testing with larger dataset would also pass.

Please note that we have made most of our testing jobs as On-Demand but we are having hard time at few. One of them being Performance Testing because that is done on a dedicated machine in a controlled environment for consistency of results. Let’s see what we can do about it.

Do you have automated testing that can be executed On-Demand? How did you implement it?

Advertisements

2 responses to “On Demand Testing”

  1. Adnan Rafiq Khan says :

    This question was asked to me by an interviewer and i replied 50%, it was only the percentage by my own experience. Now after reading your post I feel good that my experience is in right direction. Very helpful post for testers. Keep posting and happy testing

    Regards
    Adnan Khan

    Like

  2. Adnan Rafiq Khan says :

    The above comment is for article testing effort vs coding effort

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s