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Scheduled Testing

To have constant heartbeat of release, testing has to take the central stage. It can no more be an activity that is performed at the end of release cycle rather it has to happen during all the phases of a release. And mind you release cycle has shrunk from months to days.

In “Effective DevOps” book, the authors lay out many plans for making an effective plan to move towards a DevOps culture. On automation, it suggests that automation tools belong to either of the following three types:

  1. Scheduled Automation: This tool runs on a predefined schedule.
  2. Triggered Automation: This tool runs when a specific event happens…
  3. On-Demand Automation: This tool is run by the user, often on the command line…

(Page 185 under Test and Build Automation section)

The way, we took upon this advice to ramp up our efforts for Continuous Testing is that each Testing that we perform should be available in all three forms:

  1. Scheduled Testing: Daily or hourly tests to ensure that changes during that time were merged successfully. There are no disruptions by the recent changes.
  2. Triggered Testing: Testing that gets triggered on some action. For example a CI job that runs tests which was executed due to push by a Developer.
  3. On-Demand Testing: Testing that is executed on a needs basis. A quick run of tests to find out how things are on a certain front.

Take Performance testing for example. It should be scheduled to find issues on daily or weekly basis, but it could also be triggered as part of release criteria or it could be run On-Demand by an individual Developer on her box.

In order to achieve this, we re-defined our testing jobs to allow all three options at once. As the idea was to use Tools in this way, we picked upon Jenkins.

There are other options too like GoCD and Microsoft Team Foundation Server (TFS) is also catching up but Jenkins has the largest set of available plugins to do a variety of tasks. Also our prime use case was to use Jenkins as Automation Server and we have yet to define delivery pipelines.

(the original icon is at: http://www.iconarchive.com/show/plump-icons-by-zerode/Document-scheduled-tasks-icon.html )

I’ll write separately on Triggered and On-Demand testing soon and now getting into some details on how we accomplished Scheduled Testing below.

Before:

We had few physical and virtual machines, on which we were using Windows Task Scheduler to run tasks. That task will kick off on a given day and time, and would trigger Python script. The Python scripts were in a local Mercurial repository based in one of these boxes.

The testing jobs were Scheduled perfectly but the schedule and outcome of these jobs were not known to the rest of the team. Only testing knew when these jobs run and whether last job was successful or not.

After:

We made on of the boxes as Jenkins Master and others as slaves. We configured Jenkins jobs and defined the schedules there. We also moved all our Python scripts to a shared Mercurial repository on a server that anyone could get. We also created custom parts into our home grown Build system that allows running pieces in series or parallel.

Given that Jenkins gives you a web view which can be accessed by all, the testing schedule became public to everyone. Though we had a “Testing Dashboard” but it was an effort to keep it up-to-date. Also anyone in the team could see how was the last few jobs of say Performance testing and what were the results.

Moving to Jenkins and making our scripts public also helped us make same set of tests Triggered and On-Demand. More details on coming posts so as how.

I wish I could show a “Before” and “After” pictures that many marketing campaigns do to show how beautiful it now looks like.

Do you have Scheduled testing in place? What tools you use and what policies you apply?

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Trackbacks / Pingbacks

  1. On Demand Testing | Knowledge Tester - May 7, 2018
  2. Triggered Testing | Knowledge Tester - June 12, 2018

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